5 Helpful Halloween Books for Kids

Teach your kids about outside appearances, disguises and costumes with these Halloween-themed tales
Photo By Yaroslav Shuraev From Pexels

Photo by Yaroslav Shuraev from Pexels

“Go Away, Big Green Monster!”
by Ed Emberley
This classic interactive book has been helping children come to terms with their bedtime fears for more than 25 years. The storyline supports the idea that our imaginations can make up things to scare us, but we have the power to eliminate these fears. As your child encounters each part of the big green monster, he or she can shout “go away” to each part.

“Hoot Owl: Master of Disguise”
by Sean Taylor; illustrated by Jean Jullien
In this book, an owl on the hunt for food dresses up in different disguises to fool its prey. Parents can use the book to teach little ones about how animals, objects or people may look like one thing on the outside — an owl dressed up like a carrot or a sheep — but inside they haven’t changed form.

“Humbug Witch”
written and illustrated by Lorna Balian
The story starts by introducing readers to all parts of a witch (her warty nose and her tall, pointed hat), but it goes on to point out all the things this witch can’t do. What’s a witch who can’t make potions or fly on a broom? When is a witch not a witch? At the end, readers find out that the witch is only a little girl wearing a witch costume.

“The Little Old Lady Who Was Not Afraid of Anything”
by Linda D. Williams; illustrated by Megan Lloyd
This story recounts the tale of a little old woman who heads into the woods and returns home to find different articles of clothing. She finds shoes that go “clomp, clomp,” gloves, a hat and a “very big, very scary” pumpkin head. As the woman discovers each piece, she tells each one that she isn’t afraid of them. The storyline emphasizes facing your fears and taking control of your emotions.

“What’s Pretend?”
by Harriet Ziefert
Children can learn about what’s real and what’s pretend in this clever Halloween tale. The story uses simple words and images, with flaps that readers can flip up to find out what’s real or pretend.

Categories: Book Reviews