Children's Books About Inclusion and Acceptance

My kids love books. Kevin is prone to making a huge mess of books. I keep all of their books in one toy chest in their room and he loves to look at each of them, one at a time. And…he never puts them back. I have to do it with him, prompting, hand over hand….and it is getting better. This morning, I was cleaning them up (which is much faster!) and I came across our Mikayla’s Voice book. I haven’t looked at it in a while. I had the pleasure of spending the day with Mikayla and her mom on a lobbying trip to Harrisburg a few years ago. They gave Kevin the book then, which was really nice of them. Anyway, I was thinking about what a nice book it is and how we really should have more books for kids about inclusion and acceptance in our home library.

If you live near the Lehigh Valley, definitely check out Mikayla’s Voice, because now they have two book titles for sale, and she runs a few fundraisers each year that are a lot of fun.

Moon Patrol promotes the “story of us all,” ensuring that children’s bookshelves contain diverse, non-majority narratives of kids of all different races.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In Strictly No Elephants the Pet Club doesn’t understand that pets come in all shapes and sizes, just like friends. Now it is time for a boy and his tiny pet elephant to show them what it means to be a true friend.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Brand New Kid is a heartwarming story about tolerance and the need to give others a chance that will entertain and inspire children and adults alike.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Name Jar: The new kid in school needs a new name! Or does she?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See page 2 for more books about inclusion.

 

Chrysanthemum is not about disabilities but about a child who does not like her name and the other kids who think it’s too different.

 

Janine: I reviewed this book last year when it was released. Cute and fun book about kids learning to accept a classmate who is different from them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why I Laugh is a first person account about living with autism.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Say Hello

With arresting images by a master illustrator and a simple, touching text by his son, SAY HELLO evokes the joy and relief of finding a new friend just when it’s needed the most.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fur Is Only Fur Deep

Come along with Jai Jai as he discovers that fur is only fur deep. With its clear focus on international adoption, inclusion, and seeing past differences, this beautifully illustrated children’s book is perfect for both the home and the classroom.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marco and I Want to Play Ball

A true story of inclusion and self-determination- this is part of a whole series of books called the “Finding My Way” books. They have several titles about inclusion and various disabilities.

 

Lisa Lightner is a Chester County, PA mom of two. This post was adapted from the blog A Day in Our Shoes, which she co-authors. It provides support, resources and advocacy services for parents of children with special needs.

Categories: MomSpeak