Available Now
MetroKids
Bookmark and Share Email this page Email Print this page Print

Middle School Fiction & Nonfiction

The Raft, by S. A. Bodeen (Feiwel)
When the small plane carrying 15-year-old Robie goes down over open ocean, she seems doomed. The pilot is dead, the copilot is unconscious and no one knows she was on the flight. A good old-fashioned survival adventure story. (240 pages)


Etiquette & Espionage [Finishing School], by Gail Carriger (Little, Brown)
In a parallel Victorian England, Sophronia is recruited by Mademoiselle Geraldine's Finishing Academy, where she learns "the fine arts of death, diversion and the modern weaponries" from a faculty boasting a werewolf and a vampire. (307 pages)


Obsidian Mirror, by Catherine Fisher (Dial)
Jack Wilde discovers that his father disappeared while experimenting with a Victorian time machine made of an obsidian mirror. A ghost, a girl from the future, the fairy queen and Jack’s own guardian all want to use the mirror for their own purposes. (376 pages)


Seraphina, by Rachel Hartman (Random)
The royal court of Goredd celebrates a 40-year (uneasy) peace with dragonkind, but events take a dark turn when Prince Rufus is found murdered. Seraphina tries to unmask the killer, while concealing her own relationship with dragons. (476 pages)


Prodigy: A Legend Novel, by Marie Lu (Putnam)
Day (the Republic’s most wanted criminal) and June (its erstwhile prodigy) join forces with rebels to assassinate the new Elector Primo and topple his regime. But the Elector is determined to implement change — and June finds herself falling for him. (374 pages)


The Revolution of Evelyn Serrano, by Sonia Manzano (Scholastic)
In the summer of 1969, Evelyn’s charismatic but opinionated grandmother arrives from Puerto Rico and gets involved with a radical Puerto Rican Nationalist group working to empower the residents of Spanish Harlem. Evelyn, experiencing a cultural and political awakening, joins a protest herself. (215 pages)


Scarlet [Lunar Chronicles], by Marissa Meyer (Feiwel)
In this engrossing sci-fi adaptation of “Little Red Riding Hood,” a mysterious streetfighter named Wolf offers to help Scarlet find her missing grandmother. Cyborg Cinder and Thorne (Cinder), who’ve escaped from prison on a mission to stop the evil Lunar Queen, join them. (455 pages)


Colin Fischer, by Ashley Edward Miller and Zack Stentz (Razorbill/Penguin)
After a gun goes off in the cafeteria, Colin is convinced the cops suspect the wrong guy. He’s determined to find out who really brought the gun to school; having Asperger’s proves both help and hindrance to the young detective. (226 pages)


A Corner of White, by Jacqueline Moriarty (Levine/Scholastic)
From the Kingdom of Cello on the other side of a “crack” in our reality, Elliot begins corresponding with Madeline. While Elliot has learned about Madeline’s world in school, she thinks Cello is an imaginary land he’s invented. An unusual fantasy with a strong dose of humor. (376 pages)


Requiem [Delirium Trilogy], by Lauren Oliver (Harper/HarperCollins)
Lena is part of the resistance — those who escaped the cure for amor deliria nervosa (love). Meanwhile, her best friend Hana prepares to wed the soon-to-be-mayor. Fighting between the resistance and the regulators escalates to the brink of war. (391 pages)


Primates: The Fearless Science of Jane Goodall, Dian Fossey and Biruté Galdikas, by Jim Ottaviani; illustrated by Maris Wicks (First Second/Roaring Brook)
A graphic-novel format admirably propels this lightly fictionalized group biography of “Leakey’s Angels”: three female primatologists who all trained under anthropologist Louis Leakey before embarking on their own work around the world. The tone is lively but respectful. (140 pages)


Hand in Hand: Ten Black Men Who Changed America, by Andrea Davis Pinkney; illustrated by Brian Pinkney (Jump at the Sun/Disney)
Ten profiles of African American males, from Benjamin Banneker to Barack Obama, tell a story of triumph spanning American history. Each comprehensive profile includes a poem and a watercolor portrait. The 2013 Coretta Scott King Author Award winner. (243 pages)


Dodger, by Terry Pratchett (Harper/HarperCollins)
In early-Victorian London, street urchin Dodger rescues a young woman. This sets in motion Pratchett’s rewardingly complex story line, with a cast ranging from Queen Victoria to Dickens himself. Dodger is a wonderful guide through this tale of espionage, romance and heroism. (360 pages)


Orleans, by Sherri L. Smith (Putnam)
In the future necropolis of Orleans, battered by seven hurricanes, 16-year-old orphan Fen becomes the caregiver for an infant. Her one hope is to safely transport the child from Orleans to freedom with the help of an idealistic scientist. (331 pages)

Return to main book list.

Click here to download a PDF of the entire list and here to sign up for the Horn Book's e-newsletter. And be sure to keep up with all MetroKids book reviews here.

Add your comment:
Advertisement

More on this topic »Kids' Book Reviews

Kids' Book Reviews: March 2014

Kids' Book Reviews: March 2014

Kids' book reviews of Hollow City and Pure Grit

Kids Books: Leaving China & From Mona Lisa to Marge

Kids Books: Leaving China & From Mona Lisa to Marge

Kids' book reviews of Leaving China and Mona Lisa to Marge

Kids' Books About Special Needs

Kids' Books About Special Needs

Picture and chapter books that teach kids what it's like to have autism, ADHD, a physical disability or other special need

Kids' Book Reviews: August 2014

Kids' Book Reviews: August 2014

Reviews of the Children's Activity Atlas and My Teacher Is a Monster! (No, I Am Not)

Advertisement
Advertisement